Terry Dresbach

Outlander Costume Designer

Upcycling : From curtain to robe de l'anglaise

Home Outlander Costuming Discussion Forums General Costuming Discussion Upcycling : From curtain to robe de l'anglaise

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  • #8088
    Jeni
    Participant

    I hope this is ok to share here.

    I spent the last 2 days with a needle, thread and thimble and created this. Foundation pieces not seen are stays and pocket hoops, also hand made. The stomacher is a hand embroidered Dragonfly in Amber and the fabric, despite the pictures, is a cream to amber color.

    It all started life as a pair of white, bright white, curtains which I tea dyed and then I draped the pattern on to the body form.

    Please excuse the lighting

    • This topic was modified 6 years, 11 months ago by Jeni.
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    Replies
    • #8091
      maureenanne
      Participant

      Lovely! The pic of the back was hard for me to see. Do you have a bustle?

    • #8092
      Jeni
      Participant

      Thank you.
      Not on this piece, just the pleating.
      I would dress it with a butt pad depending on the person’s padding. Alternatively, i’d switch out the pocket hoops for bum roll.

    • #8111
      AnCatDubh1980
      Participant

      How beautiful! You’re very talented.

    • #8112
      Jeni
      Participant

      Thank you 🙂

    • #8115
      maureenanne
      Participant

      How long did it take you to hand embroider the stomacher?

    • #8120
      Jeni
      Participant

      Hi Maureenanne,
      The stomacher embroidery took me about 6 hours, i think. Its then boned, back and wrapped. All in all about 2 evenings in front of the tv.

    • #8123
      maureenanne
      Participant

      How did you get started making these lovely clothes? Do you make your own patterns? I have embroidered quite a few wraps and I used industrial embroidery machine. I really appreciate the authenticity of the hand embroidery. Take care.

    • #8127
      AllisonL
      Participant

      Beautiful work! I study historical embroidery for medieval reenactment, so I understand the “inches per hour” concept for doing intensive handwork. I’m interested in where you got your gown pattern? I usually draft my own from paintings and extant garments, but I’ve never tackled anything past 1600.

    • #8128
      maureenanne
      Participant

      Allison, do you have any patterns for Celtic women Ireland, Scotland, Wales medieval time period? Any sense of the colors used?

    • #8129
      Jeni
      Participant

      Maureenanne;
      I originally started making costume reproductions such as Harry Potter uniforms. Then I did a very medieval pieces and Victorian and now 18th century. I drape my own patterns according to underpinnings and historical elements and fabric.
      The embroidery the started as something to do on an evening. I started embroidering bible verses and then moved on to images. I think machine embroidery looks very complicated, but so so pretty.

      Allison;
      Oh medieval embroidery is beautiful. I was lucky enough to see the Bayeux Tapestry many years ago and i’m still in awe of it and anyone who attempts such fine stitches.
      As for the gown pattern, i didn’t have one. It was all draped on to a body form wearing hoops and stays. I used Janet Arnold’s book for flounces, pleats and bodice to stomacher shaping. All just pictures and reproductions.

      I’m currently quilting 18th Century jumps. What are you ladies working on?

    • #8130
      maureenanne
      Participant

      I have an old website that I still maintain and I keep telling myself that I am going to take a week off to update this. Check out celticblouses.com and you can see some of the designs I’ve worked on. I too keep it simple and use paintings to get a sense of the patterns. I really dislike skirts and so I focused quite a bit of effort on the blouse or bodice. My favorite styles are medieval and empire/Josephine. You can see some of the embroidered images on the wraps and I did make one that I called Dragonfly in Amber. My interest these days is jewelry making and I love, love chatelaine belts. It has been hard for me to get the right balance of metal for the belt, fabric for the purse and keys and knives to make it authentic. The one I am working on now is hammered silver chain, plaid pouch with an embroidered thistle and then large skeleton keys and a celtic dart hanging down. I love the image in my mind but I don’t like what I am seeing in front of me yet 🙁 This is just my hobby and so I pick it up when I can. Take care. Maureen

    • #8131
      Jeni
      Participant

      Oh Maureen! I’m looking over your blog in awe. The colors and the designs. The wraps are beautiful. And i love the vivid blue you use.
      Chatelaines are beautiful works of practical art and so individual to the wearer and maker. When something isn’t pleasing to my eye i generally take a break from it. However, i now have a box of works in progress that’s keeps growing.
      Having seen your textile work, i’m sure your metal work will turn out beautiful and i hope to see it when its done.

      I have more pieces on my facebook page, my blog is a work in progress – TattersToTogs
      Jeni

      • #8132
        maureenanne
        Participant

        Thank you so much! Your work is much more authentic than mine! I love seeing the shift, stays and the deep pockets. I like your stylish marvel character work as well. Is that hand beading on the purse? Very cool. Maureen

    • #8133
      AllisonL
      Participant

      Maureenanne: there isn’t a lot of source material for Scotland, Ireland and Wales in the early medieval period, but you can get a lot of inspiration for historical design from early medieval Irish illuminated manuscripts such as the Book of Kells and the Book of Durrow. Also, the Vikings/Norse were invading and settling Ireland and Scotland during this time (the Vikings founded Dublin, did you know that?) and you can look at their art styles from that time for ideas as well. There was a huge cultural mix between the local Celtic tribes and the Vikings during this time. Generally, though, that area of Europe was so far in the backwater of culture that there is very little information about the clothing or embroidery.

      • #8137
        maureenanne
        Participant

        Great idea about the illuminated manuscripts! I love the jewel like colors. I visited Ireland when I was in law school I was on more of a spiritual journey at that time. I wish I would have paid more attention to the Viking influence. Wonder what Vikings (the show )is using as basis for clothing design. Makes sense that the clothing worn by the Viking women would have migrated and blended with the clothing of the earlier Celts in the British Isles. Thanks. Maureen

    • #8138
      Jeni
      Participant

      Thank you, Maureen! I do strive to have authentic sewing methods, which results in a lot of hand stitching.
      Yes, the Marvel bags are hand beaded, each one with about 5000 beads each and then the bags are hand made too.
      Jeni

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