Terry Dresbach

Outlander Costume Designer

Shirt on Wedding Night

Home Outlander Costuming Discussion Forums Characters Jamie Shirt on Wedding Night

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  • #1980
    Tamlacam
    Participant

    I’m curious about the decision for Jamie to be in his long shirt for much of the wedding night rather than shirtless in his kilt. Was that related to the prosthetics or otherwise?

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    • #2030
      alix
      Participant

      I thought that to be period, the kilt would have been one of the first items to go. A great kilt has 9 yards of fabric and I would think would be white heavy and cumbersome for the bedchamber.

      However, speaking of the shirt, is there a particular pattern that was used? I would like to make one for a family member.

      • #3527
        sidhesong
        Participant

        18th century clothing patterns are available online. Primarily they are used by 18th century re-enactors. Two sources of an 18th century shirt pattern are http://www.jas-townsend.com (JR men’s shirt pattern JR-707) and http://www.smoke-fire.com (Kannik’s Korner Patterns KK-4101). I only just saw your post, so I am very late to respond to your question. I hope you see this.

    • #2117
      Dorothy
      Participant

      Here’s my understanding about 18th century shirts:

      In the 18th century a man wore his shirt or a woman wore her shift just about continuously. The shirt was a combination of undergarment and sleeping garment and had many practical uses. And, remember, they wore no under pants, so removing one’s shirt meant stripping naked. A man could even work ONLY in his shirt, with the tails tied between his legs. In the subsequent novels, there are scenes where Jamie is working in his shirt alone, or Claire is working in her shift alone. An example of a time in this series where Jamie might have been working in his shirt only is in Episode 2, Castle Leoch. In the flashback where Jamie is telling Claire about the Red Coats coming to his home, he’s pitching hay — hot, dirty work; he might have taken his kilt off for this work. (For narrative reasons — we wouldn’t have wanted Jamie dragged off by the Red Coats just clad in his shirt — Jamie’s wearing his kilt, too.)

      So, this is a long way of saying that his shirt is the LAST garment Jamie would have removed, not the first. In fact, if Claire hadn’t asked him to take off his shirt, he most likely wouldn’t have done so at all. In Episode 7 (and even more so in the book) Jamie is surprised, though agreeable, when she says she wants to look at him.

      In regard to alix’s comment, for Jamie to have removed his kilt earlier in the scene would have been comparable to a contemporary man stripping naked. So, no, the kilt had to stay on until Claire initiated “things”.

      • #2164
        Helga
        Participant

        Excellent summing up of 18th century mores Dorothy.

        Jamie does seem bemused that Claire would ask him to remove his shirt. She is a mid-20th century woman with very different norms as to what is acceptable dress and undress. People did not remove their shirts and shifts at any time save to wash and even then they most often washed in their undergarments, the reason being twofold; religious mores forbade nudity and the weather often didn’t permit less than a linen covering. It was damned cold!

    • #2159
      Helga
      Participant

      Jamie’s wedding shirt is very beautiful and accurate for the time. The narrow lace ribbon at the sleeve ruffle is the perfect effect. Lace was very expensive and would have been rare for any other than aristocrats. A nice touch to his costume.

    • #2221
      Terry Dresbach
      Keymaster

      You guys got this one covered!! Excellent.

    • #2264
      Tamlacam
      Participant

      Thanks so much for such informative answers! Its obvious that a lot of care and thought went into all of the costuming for the show, and the results are simply lovely.

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