Terry Dresbach

Outlander Costume Designer

Other books!

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  • #3498
    rachely
    Participant

    We should start a book club! Or at least a place to put book recommendations for like-minded readers!

    In no particular order here are books I’ve liked with–as what Robin McKinley calls–“girls who DO things”

    Robin McKinley: all of them, but I adore Sunshine, Hero and the Crown (YA), The Blue Sword (YA).

    Katherine Neville: The Eight and Calculated Risk.

    Laurie King, the Russell/Holmes books. They’re often viewed as “just mysteries” (rather like Outlander is “a romance novel”) but they are awesome. (And would make good TV *cough* Ron)

    Geraldine Brooks: Year of Wonders and People of the Book

    Some typicals that I’m sure most of you know.

    Madeleine L’Engle, natch, should you be looking for books for your children (or yourself, I still read them all the time)

    Suzanne Collins: the Hunger Games books.

    Barbara Kingsolver, of course.

    Phillip Pullman: His Dark Materials books

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    • #3509
      Hope
      Participant

      Rachely; I love this idea. I’ve been enjoying the voices on this forum, and I think we would have great discussions. I also still read young adult and even children’s books; I never stopped even when my children would no longer let me read to them. I am a huge fan of Robin McKinley, I also really loved her book Deerskin; it has a very dreamlike/fantastical sequence when the heroine heals herself/gets healed of her serious trauma. (Avoiding spoiler here.) I’ve read a good percentage of the books you’ve mentioned, but I don’t mind rereading and I read in most genres. (Not horror, at least not most, and I rarely enjoy vampires, Sunshine being a stellar exception.)

      • This reply was modified 7 years, 7 months ago by Hope.
      • #3528
        rachely
        Participant

        Deerskin is the one I never re-read… I’ll have to go pull it off the shelf and read it.

        Sunshine is clearly the best vampire book EVER. And I love when Robin talks about Con not sparkling 🙂

        Did you read Shadows I adored that one.

        (I love YA novels. I think it’s because I’m still in hopes that I was actually special. You know, a wizard, have ESP, be able to tame vampires, travel in time… now I just drink)

      • #3569
        Hope
        Participant

        Rachel;
        I think some of the best writing is being done in young adult fiction. I like sex scenes, but they’re usually poorly done, so YA is a relief. And I agree, why not fantasize about those magical possibilities. It does seem to me that there are a huge number of post-apocalyptic YA books, some good, but some just depressing, so I avoid many of those. I like books that take me out of myself and/or give me hope for the future. I actually haven’t read Shadow yet, or Pegasus either. I do have some issues with my eyes, so tend to listen to books more than read print. I’m also waiting for the sequel to Pegasus before I read it, although it doesn’t appear to be coming very soon from what I can tell. I will read Shadow now though, inspired by this. I don’t think it’s going to be made into an audiobook.

    • #3542
      michellibell
      Participant

      The Wilderness Series by Sara Donati has a great multi-generation plot that follows strong women.
      I also liked The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane. It’s a great read this time of year.
      And for the vampire/witch mention, I liked Deborah Harkness’ All Souls Trilogy which begins with A Discovery of Witches.

      • #3728
        filmfixation
        Participant

        LOVE All Souls Trilogy! Has anyone read Daughter of Smoke and Bone series from Lani Taylor? Love them.

        Ive never read Robin McKinley…will look into it! Some great books I’ve recently read:

        The Golem and the Jinni: Helene Wrecker

        The Dinner: Herman Kock

        Americanah:Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

        Not That Kind of Girl: Lena Dunham

        Tenth of December: George Saunders

    • #3558
      ValhallaLilly
      Participant

      My friend got me into the Fever series. By Karen Marie Moaning. Which is like the most awkward name ever to have to ask for in a book store.
      I guess it would be um urban fantasy/ romance? I’m not sure. Anyway that’s not a series I would have wandered into had she not given me the first two books but I really enjoyed them.

    • #3589
      AnCatDubh1980
      Participant

      Good idea! I’m always looking for suggestions to my already lengthy reading list.

      If anyone is looking for another series of highly detailed historical novels with rich character development and lots of adventure, I’d highly recommend Patrick O’Brian’s Aubrey/Maturin (Master & Commander) series. After reading all 21 of them, the voice in your head starts to sound like a strange cross between a foul-mouthed sailor and Mr. Darcy 😉

      As for historical romances, Anya Seton’s are classics. She wrote mostly in the 40’s & 50’s, with a few after. I remember first reading them when I was about 11 or 12 years old (what can I say, as long as a book looked thick, no one much paid attention to what I read) and it was more her lovely language and expressions of human emotions that stuck with me, moreso than the specific characters or plots or details. Green Darkness has an element of the spiritual/supernatural about it and Devil Water is about the 1715/45 Jacobite Risings.

      I actually read alot more non-fiction than I do fiction. My favorite author is Alison Weir. She has done biographies of women such as Eleanor of Aquitaine, Isabella of France, Katherine Swynford, Elizabeth Wydeville, and Mary Boleyn. Her next book is about Margaret Douglas, niece of Henry VIII and grandmother of James I. Her primary source research is top-notch, and her writing makes household accounts and probate inventories seem absolutely fascinating. She also writes some Tudor-period historical fiction, but I haven’t explored those yet.

    • #3729
      michellibell
      Participant

      [quote quote=3728]LOVE All Souls Trilogy! Has anyone read Daughter of Smoke and Bone series from Lani Taylor? Love them.

      Ive never read Robin McKinley…will look into it! Some great books I’ve recently read:

      The Golem and the Jinni: Helene Wrecker

      The Dinner: Herman Kock

      Americanah:Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

      Not That Kind of Girl: Lena Dunham

      Tenth of December: George Saunders

      [/quote]
      I want to read Daughter of Smoke and Bone – I hear they are so good!

      • #3730
        filmfixation
        Participant

        DO IT! You will not be disappointed.

    • #3734
      filmfixation
      Participant

      I lied. I’ve totally read Robin McKinley. I devoured so many of her books in my teens. Havent read Sunshine though and am excited to!!

    • #3735
      rachely
      Participant

      I LOVELOVELOVE Sunshine. Talk about a woman ignoring her (real and scary) fears and saving herself.

    • #3736
      rachely
      Participant

      *real and scary bookwise, I mean. Unless there really are demons and magicians and vampires and i just haven’t noticed enough to be scared of in real life.

    • #3818
      therabbitrules
      Participant

      I wanted to add an author to the reading list. Susanna Kearsley. I loved The Winter Sea and The Rose Garden. Diana and Susanna are both appearing at an upcoming writers conference. Really anything by Susanna is a lovely read.

    • #3834
      barbc624
      Participant

      Loved the All Souls Trilogy. I got to meet Deborah at San Diego ComicCon – she was very sweet.

      Daughter of Smoke and Bones series

      Robin Mckinley – loved Sunshine but haven’t read her other books

      The Gate to Women’s Country and Singer from the Sea plus others by Shari S. Tepper

      Stardust by Neil Gaiman

      Philippa Gregory – her historicals including The Other Boleyn Girl

      Sabriel,Lirael and Abhorsen trilogy by Garth Nix

      I was looking atThe Winter Sea by Susananah Kearsley but couldn’t quite decide – sounds like I should give it a try

      Dead Witch Walking and the rest of Kim Harrison’s The Hollows series about Rachel Morgan a witch/bounty hunter who is an outsider among outsiders.

      • This reply was modified 7 years, 7 months ago by barbc624.
      • This reply was modified 7 years, 7 months ago by barbc624.
      • This reply was modified 7 years, 7 months ago by barbc624.
    • #3862
      michellibell
      Participant

      I tried Dead Witch Walking, and just didn’t feel it enough to follow up with her others.

      But, I did go to the public library in town and they don’t have Daughter of Smoke and Bone… so Amazon it is.

    • #3867
      rachely
      Participant

      NYTimes Women & Power book issue (with a really weird graphic)

      http://www.nytimes.com/pages/books/review/index.html

    • #3889
      elizlk
      Participant

      [quote quote=3818]I wanted to add an author to the reading list. Susanna Kearsley. I loved The Winter Sea and The Rose Garden. Diana and Susanna are both appearing at an upcoming writers conference. Really anything by Susanna is a lovely read. [/quote]

      Yes, I just read the Kearsley books and really enjoyed them. Harkness also a good, fun read. Also, if you look at Diana Gabaldon’s site, you can find her “Methadone list” of authors/books she really enjoys. I love the Phil Rickman Merrily Watkins books (which are on the list.)

    • #3890
      elizlk
      Participant

      Really love the Laurie R King/Mary Russell series (recommend reading in order), as mentioned previously.
      Also in the strong women / mystery genre are Nevada Barr’s Anna Pigeon series (also recommend reading in order)
      I will have to go and look at my Goodreads list and see what else might be of interest here.

      • #3934
        elizlk
        Participant

        And the Elizabeth George series

    • #3927
      rachely
      Participant

      Toni Morrison’s A Mercy. It’s not an easy read (are any of her books?)but it’s amazing. “Such were the ravages of Vaark’s death. And the consequences of women in thrall to men or pointedly without them.”

      And on the non-fiction front Queen of the Conqueror: The Life of Matilda, Wife of William I by Tracy Joanne Borman. I can’t say it was written that well, but it was interesting and Matilda would have been a card carrying member of the Pushy Bitch Union.

    • #4082
      rachely
      Participant
    • #4102
      CelticGlamazon
      Participant

      Everyone has listed so many amazing books. These are a few of mine, because I could list beloved books all day, but will attempt to limit my listing.

      The Handmaid’s Tale : Margaret Atwood

      Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi

      In the fluffy, guilty indulgence category,

      The Black Jewels Trilogy (that was not strictly a trilogy) by Anne Bishop

      Anything by Neil Gaiman but especially American Gods

      The Oz books (Wicked, Son of a Witch, & A lion Among Men) by Gregory Maguire

      Finally, once I finish Written in My Own Heart’s Blood by Herself I plan to undertake…

      Highlander and Fever Series by Karen Marie Moning

    • #4203
      rachely
      Participant

      I just started rereading Year of Wonders if anyone else wants to play along.

      • #4211
        barbc624
        Participant

        Never read it but it looks interesting – I just ordered if for my kindle. If others are interested maybe you could start a thread and we can do a regular discussion group on it.

    • #4615
      Theresa
      Participant

      Great thread! I am also a huge reader, though I’m submerged in Outlander world for the time being (first reads, I’m on ABOSAA and haven’t read the novellas yet). I also really love Karen Marie Moning’s Highlander and Fever series. I would really like to see the Fever series in the hands of someone capable. I also really enjoyed Laini Taylor’s Daughter of Smoke and Bone trilogy, Leigh Bardugo’s Grisha trilogy and Samantha Shannon’s The Bone Season series (which is being adapted by Andy Serkis!). My other great love is metaphysical writing/poetry, especially John Donne, George Herbert, Robert Bly and Thomas Merton. I will also admit to enjoying Anya Seaton and most of Cassandra Clare’s books.

    • #4630
      CelticGlamazon
      Participant

      [quote quote=4615]Great thread! I am also a huge reader, though I’m submerged in Outlander world for the time being (first reads, I’m on ABOSAA and haven’t read the novellas yet). I also really love Karen Marie Moning’s Highlander and Fever series. I would really like to see the Fever series in the hands of someone capable. I also really enjoyed Laini Taylor’s Daughter of Smoke and Bone trilogy, Leigh Bardugo’s Grisha trilogy and Samantha Shannon’s The Bone Season series (which is being adapted by Andy Serkis!). My other great love is metaphysical writing/poetry, especially John Donne, George Herbert, Robert Bly and Thomas Merton. I will also admit to enjoying Anya Seaton and most of Cassandra Clare’s books. [/quote]

      I’m half way through Outlander book 8, and after I go back to read the Lord John Grey books, I’m starting Karen Marie Moning. Everyone has told me they’re great, and after Outlander is finished, for now, I’ll need something to console me.

      You’re also the 10th person, in the last month, to mention Daughter of Smoke and Bone…so I’m adding that to my list.

      /does the new book list happy dance

    • #5317
      rachely
      Participant

      Just remembered these: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/298438.Kerstin_Gier

      Kerstin Gier’s Ruby Red trilogy. They are Young Adult, and young YA (only kissing and MAYBE an unbuttoned shirt, rather silly plot, main character acts very young, amazing best friend). I admit I LOVE them. And they have time travel! and Count St. Germain! Rakoczy! COSTUMES! Oh! the Costumes!

      Terry: read them for the Costume Designer (whose name I can’t remember)because she is the best and see if Little Moore might like them.

    • #5382
      CelticGlamazon
      Participant

      For those that have read Karen Marie Moning’s The Highlander Series, am I doing this wrong? I started with Book One: Beyond the Highland Mist, and so far it’s barely tolerable. Should I start with a different book? So many have raved about this series. I’m not one for pure bodice rippers, and if that’s what I spent my money on I’ll be disappointed.

      Any advice? Personal experiences?

    • #5383
      elizlk
      Participant

      You should go for the Fever series, not the Highlander ones, which are basically bodice rippers ….

    • #5387
      rachely
      Participant

      I may have stayed up really late reading Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick. It showed up as a Nook “under $2.99 book” and had a big ol’ ALA Gold Medallion on it, otherwise I probably wouldn’t have known it existed. It was quite enthralling, labeled as a YA 9th Grade + book but rather intricate and lovely.

    • #5391
      CelticGlamazon
      Participant

      [quote quote=5383]You should go for the Fever series, not the Highlander ones, which are basically bodice rippers ….[/quote]

      I bought the first 7 Highlander Series books, before reading the first book. /hangs head 🙁

    • #5395
      michellibell
      Participant

      [quote quote=5391]

      <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>elizlk wrote:</div>
      You should go for the Fever series, not the Highlander ones, which are basically bodice rippers ….

      I bought the first 7 Highlander Series books, before reading the first book. /hangs head :(
      [/quote]

      [quote quote=5391]

      <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>elizlk wrote:</div>
      You should go for the Fever series, not the Highlander ones, which are basically bodice rippers ….

      I bought the first 7 Highlander Series books, before reading the first book. /hangs head :(
      [/quote]
      BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!

    • #5396
      CelticGlamazon
      Participant

      [quote quote=5395]

      <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>CelticGlamazon wrote:</div>

      <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>elizlk wrote:</div>
      You should go for the Fever series, not the Highlander ones, which are basically bodice rippers ….

      I bought the first 7 Highlander Series books, before reading the first book. /hangs head :(

      <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>CelticGlamazon wrote:</div>

      <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>elizlk wrote:</div>
      You should go for the Fever series, not the Highlander ones, which are basically bodice rippers ….

      I bought the first 7 Highlander Series books, before reading the first book. /hangs head :(

      BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!
      [/quote]

      It (bundled ebook) was on sale, and well…yeah…that’s all I’ve got. 😛

    • #5458
      rachely
      Participant

      Just read Sex & Violence by Carrie Mesrobian

      It’s YA, and interestingly written in a male POV. I have no idea how realistic a boy-POV novel written by a woman is, but it was really interesting–especially for someone who almost always reads female-POV books.

      Anyway, 5 cent synopsis: Evan is a 17 year old with dead mother and distant father, goes from school to school to boarding school to school, likes sex (he goes down on girls people!), likes girls, not fond of monogamy or relationships, gets the shit kicked out of him, dad takes him to small-town Minnesota to heal and go to therapy, he learns about life, about girls, about people, himself.

      It sounds totally typical but was seriously interesting and engaging and moving.

      Would not recommend for anyone with a teenage boy-child whom they think isn’t thinking about, or having, sex all the time. (Having known a few teenage boys in my life, and having been Evan’s Girl Who Would Say Yes he seems pretty typical for the boys I knew 20 years ago)

      https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17339214-sex-violence?from_search=true

    • #5639
      sonyakhanum
      Participant

      Hi all. I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations for a non-fiction about the American Revolution? I’m Canadian, never lived in the US, and after reading the Outlander series, I realized that I actually don’t know much about that part of American history and would like to know more (which is actually funny, because there’s constantly an internal debate in Canada about how we know more about American history/politics than we do our own). I love historical non-fiction, so any recommendations would be greatly appreciated! (I realize that this post may come across as super nerdy, I apologize).

    • #5641
      elizlk
      Participant

      [quote quote=5639]Hi all. I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations for a non-fiction about the American Revolution? I’m Canadian, never lived in the US, and after reading the Outlander series, I realized that I actually don’t know much about that part of American history and would like to know more (which is actually funny, because there’s constantly an internal debate in Canada about how we know more about American history/politics than we do our own). I love historical non-fiction, so any recommendations would be greatly appreciated! (I realize that this post may come across as super nerdy, I apologize).[/quote]
      I would check out some of Diana Gabaldon’s resource lists. She has good resources in Outlandish Companion, I know.

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