Terry Dresbach

Outlander Costume Designer

Material Culture

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  • #2141
    adevora
    Participant

    Thank you for setting up this forum. As an historic archaeologist I love all things material culture and the show looks fantastic. The costumes and knitwear are great. Curious if your role/research extends to the larger set decor? Are you using a local source for repros (i.e. bottles, glassware, pottery etc.)?

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    • #2217
      Terry Dresbach
      Keymaster

      No, that is the art department, headed by my best friend Gary Steele

      • #2258
        Hope
        Participant

        Hi Terry;
        When I saw this thread title I was hoping it would be about fabrics and all the other pieces you use to do the costuming. I first realized my love of fabrics when my favorite exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum in Denver was the incredibly fine linen fabric in the Egyptian exhibit. It is thousands of years old and still in one piece, and the threads are so fine it amazing to think about the skill of the artisans who made it. Personally, I would love to hear about your fabrics in detail; the sourcing, the material, what it takes to use them in the ways that you do. I love the vest that helped inspire the wedding dress among other things and it would be nice to see more of that kind of thing, although I guess you must have trade secrets to hold on to. But what you can share would be great.
        Thanks, Hope

    • #2383
      lysaleelee
      Participant

      hello!

      I was wondering lately.. I always thought that “french fashion” only crossed the Channel after the French Revolution, and not before. I mean, I thought that UK was at least 2 or 3 years late regarding french clothing at this period, and we know that things/ideas didn’t travel very fast at this time, nor very far either….. so I was curious to know what you chose to use French Court model for the wedding dress…

      • #3643
        Dorothy
        Participant

        The Brits — including, of course, the Scots, have had an ambivalent attitude towards French fashions and mores for centuries. The French are seen as both refined and effete (among other stereotyped views).

        In the context of the books and the series, a couple of thoughts:

        Mary Queen of Scots was Queen of France (briefly) and brought a taste for French things home with her to Scotland a couple hundred years before our story takes place. There are close cultural ties between Scotland and France. We will see, for instance, the Fraser connections of Abbott Alexander Fraser and Jared Fraser who’ve both made their homes in France, as have a number of emigre Jacobites. (Interesting trivia: the term “caddy” for the boy who carries your golf clubs seems to originate from Mary’s time. It comes from the French word “cadet” meaning young family member.)

        Remember, too, that Jamie spent several years in France. In the 18th century the University of Paris was among the very finest in the world, and Jamie’s father sent him there. Jamie later spent a couple years as a mercenary with the French army.

        Terry has stated that in the Series Dougal’s backstory includes time in France, too. This helps account for his aristocratic, refined appearance, including why he wears breeks (or, as Terry says, “trews”) rather than a kilt.

        Surely one of the most amusing and evocative lines in the Series comes from the scene where Mrs. Fitz is dressing Claire for the first time. When she expresses surprise at Claire’s bra, Claire explains that it’s French. Mrs. Fitz’s reaction skillfully captures a mixture of shock, titillation, and the view that those French women are likely to do or wear just about anything.

      • #3646
        lysaleelee
        Participant

        actually historically speaking the links between France and Ecosse are even older… since 1295 to be precise, with the Auld Alliance,and end with the death of Marie de Guise, mother of Mairi queen of Scotland and (briely Queen of France and spouse of Fran├žois II) in 1560. some scottish people could have a double nationality (French/Scot) until 1903 . It was also a religious alliance (catholics).

        But I’m still curious to see what it’s coming our way in term of costuming… because the best is always to come ­čÖé

        • This reply was modified 7 years, 7 months ago by lysaleelee.
    • #2673
      kladislaus
      Participant

      Hi Adevora,

      I have a degree in Archaeology, so, like yourself am also interested in ‘material culture’. Not a whole lot of textiles have survived through time, so I am always keen to see any examples that have been preserved. I am also fascinated by examples of historic fashions, and know relatively little about them. So Outlander has been a feast of fashion for me.

      Kathleen

      • #3645
        lysaleelee
        Participant

        actually historically speaking the links between France and Ecosse are even older… since 1295 to be precise, with the Auld Alliance,and end with the death of Marie de Guise, mother of Mairi queen of Scotland and (briely Queen of France and spouse of Fran├žois II) in 1560. some scottish people could have a double nationality (French/Scot) until 1903 . It was also a religious alliance (catholics).

        But I’m still curious to see what it’s coming our way in term of costuming… because the best is always to come ­čÖé

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