Terry Dresbach

Outlander Costume Designer

HIATUS – WHAT DO YOU WANT TO KNOW?

Home Outlander Costuming Discussion Forums General Costuming Discussion HIATUS – WHAT DO YOU WANT TO KNOW?

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  • #2568
    Terry Dresbach
    Keymaster

    Oh that is a can of worms, but we do have 5 months ( am not blogging during Christmas)

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    • #2618
      katie
      Participant

      Terry, will time constraints allow for embroidery during season 2? 18th century France has so many possibilities, but I know you have a ton to do and only so much time to do it in.

      Going off of that, is there room for extra help? I have heard that knitters couldn’t volunteer because of legal difficulties, but if you had ‘intern’ embroiderers stitching your designs, would that get around the legal issues? I’m only asking because it sounds like you could use extra hands, and there’s a fairly sizable (and skilled) community of historic embroiderers who would love to contribute to this kind of project.

      The Plimouth jacket was largely stitched in this way – volunteer embroiderers were vetted for skill, then came to the jacket and volunteered their time to stitch on the designs with the materials provided. I don’t know if this could actually work on Outlander, but as an embroiderer I have loved the costuming, your creative vision, and am really looking forward to season 2!

      • #2772
        Terry Dresbach
        Keymaster

        Oh, you just do not know how much I would LOVE to do that. Not only is it tremendously helpful, but I just love the idea of it, the spirit and energy. It also brings a diverse artistic vision. That is a hard part of the job, seeing not only through your on eyes, but the eyes of others.
        But unfortunately, it is not allowed by our corporate parent. Just breaks my heart because I know how many talented and loving hands are out there!
        I have pushed, shoved, elbowed and fought to start Season 2 prep about a month ago, I have been designing it for almost a year. Otherwise we will be in serious trouble. It MUST be good. And YES, there will be embroidery, so help me God.

      • #2785
        rachely
        Participant

        I was telling my husband this morning that this forum was full of women who were desperately trying NOT to say “LET ME HELP! YOU DON’T NEED TO PAY ME!” Because it’s slightly embarrassing to look so desperate… even if true 🙂

      • #2793
        ellenchristine
        Participant

        Or, it’s a group of us with diverse talents lending moral, and if needed, actual support. We want the crew to feel the love!

      • #3957
        Juli
        Participant

        I’ll bring my Wilcom, Walcom and embroidery machine, and years of experience to Scotland and whip you up a bonnie heap of elegant embroidery for free. Just give me an accused to take me away from my teenangers! LOL

    • #2620
      rteest42
      Participant

      When do you sleep? No, seriously. I am in awe of your energy. I love my sleep far too much, and I don’t have a Mary Poppins about, but I am always proud of myself if I have the dishes washed before I go to bed at night and a load of laundry cooking every other day.

      • #2631
        MomToThings1n2
        Participant

        You are doin even better then me! I am happy if everyone just gets to bed alive…lol. The dishes can and have waited.

      • #2773
        Terry Dresbach
        Keymaster

        One of the challenges of this business, getting enough sleep. We run on empty a lot. When I was younger I used to get sick a lot, from exhaustion and stress. Somehow I have managed not to on this show, which is amazing considering that it has just been insanely stressful. But I lead a pretty clem life compared to my wild days when I first got started. I don’t smoke, I have one occasional cocktail in the evening, and I eat very healthfully.
        But I do not get enough sleep, that is a definite. I am exhausted all the time.
        Gary, our production designer, just got home, and slept for 20 hours straight.

      • #3122
        Katie (@bunnums)
        Participant

        It might help that this is a passion project for you. It’s amazing how that mindset can offset some of the damage that can be done by stress.

        Not that you can out-run exhaustion forever. Gonna pay that price eventually if it goes on too long. 🙂

        Katie

      • #3872
        Pamela
        Participant

        [quote quote=2773]One of the challenges of this business, getting enough sleep. We run on empty a lot. When I was younger I used to get sick a lot, from exhaustion and stress. Somehow I have managed not to on this show, which is amazing considering that it has just been insanely stressful. But I lead a pretty clem life compared to my wild days when I first got started. I don’t smoke, I have one occasional cocktail in the evening, and I eat very healthfully.
        But I do not get enough sleep, that is a definite. I am exhausted all the time.
        Gary, our production designer, just got home, and slept for 20 hours straight.[/quote]

        Have you found any time to meditate? I remember you mentioning it last year when you were getting acclimated back to Scotland–you were so jetlag.

    • #2621
      elizlk
      Participant

      A couple of topics come to mind:
      1 – Given the Paris/Versailles setting for part of DIA, I’m guessing you’ll have options to rent costumes that you didn’t for other settings. What is the thought process around that?
      2 – Do you develop your sketches/ideas chronologically based on the story, or do you have some idea of potential shooting schedule, and (presuming it’s out of order) design that way? or something else?
      3 – Do you ever pick DG’s brain about costume?
      4 – Sketches/ideas for S1 costumes to come …. although I really try to let it unfold on screen first, then get into the artistry/decisions underneath it afterwards. … So, maybe that leads to
      5 – Are there any un-explored topics from Ep1-8 of S1? Besides putting on the kilt, that is?

      • #2630
        elizlk
        Participant

        Another idea … your To Do list had “construct season 2” as an item … what does that mean/entail?

      • #2780
        Terry Dresbach
        Keymaster

        Construct = to make

    • #2634
      OregonWeaver
      Participant

      Terry,
      How many yards of fabric were in the wedding dress? Do you have someone on staff that weaves the special fabrics for you? I’m guessing season 2 will see much more in the way of fancy gowns, will you get most of your fabrics in Europe or do you already have ideas and ship from LA?

      Thanks for your time! Enjoy your children!

      • #2775
        Terry Dresbach
        Keymaster

        Make the costumes.

        And yes, I will write in detail about Season Two at some point. Probably in between seasons, but not sure.

      • #2781
        Terry Dresbach
        Keymaster

        [quote quote=2775]Make the costumes.

        And yes, I will write in detail about Season Two at some point. Probably in between seasons, but not sure.
        [/quote]

      • #2782
        Terry Dresbach
        Keymaster

        [quote quote=2634]Terry,
        How many yards of fabric were in the wedding dress? Do you have someone on staff that weaves the special fabrics for you? I’m guessing season 2 will see much more in the way of fancy gowns, will you get most of your fabrics in Europe or do you already have ideas and ship from LA?

        Thanks for your time! Enjoy your children!
        [/quote]

        12 yards for the silver gown. Probably another 8 in petticoats and undergarments.
        We will buy our fabrics here in Europe. But we will dye, print, embroider and paint a lot of them.

    • #2635
      rteest42
      Participant

      [quote quote=2631]You are doin even better then me! I am happy if everyone just gets to bed alive…lol. The dishes can and have waited.[/quote]Oh, I said IF. They often don’t, but I AM inordinately proud of myself if they ARE done…lol

      • #4741
        Hadley_LP
        Participant

        Hi Terry,

        You’d mentioned in the Q&A that you have staff that create the patterns for the costumes. I’m curious because I know of local theatre costume shop that makes their mock-ups in muslin first before ever cutting into the actual fabric.

        ~Are the patterns done in cloth and sewn together as mock-ups to see if they’ll fit the actors or their dress form first?

        You’ve also mentioned using using old techniques in making the wedding dress that haven’t been used in a while.

        ~Are all the costumes made on modern machines? Or has the staff found that some older machines or sewing tools work for the period styles that you need to achieve?

        • This reply was modified 7 years, 6 months ago by Hadley_LP.
      • #4743
        Terry Dresbach
        Keymaster

        [quote quote=4741]Hi Terry,

        You’d mentioned in the Q&A that you have staff that create the patterns for the costumes. I’m curious because I know of local theatre costume shop that makes their mock-ups in muslin first before ever cutting into the actual fabric.

        ~Are the patterns done in cloth and sewn together as mock-ups to see if they’ll fit the actors or their dress form first?

        You’ve also mentioned using using old techniques in making the wedding dress that haven’t been used in a while.

        ~Are all the costumes made on modern machines? Or has the staff found that some older machines or sewing tools work for the period styles that you need to achieve?
        [/quote]

        The patterns are made first in paper, based on the designs. (We keep a library of patterns)
        Then a muslin or a calico (UK) is made and fit on the actor. From there we make it in final cloth.

        We have a hodge lodge of machines. A few banks of commercial modern machines, but then there are all manner and assortment of odd ancient machinery about our shop.

      • #4779
        Gael
        Participant

        Terry, I just finished Emily St John Mandel’s novel Station 11. It is nominated for the National Book Award. In a post apocalyptic world decimated by flu, a band of travelling performers keep culture alive with classical music and Shakespeare. Costuming is very important , but their purpose and motto is”survival is insufficient” from Star Trek : Voyager, episode 122, written by Ronald D. Moore, as acknowledged by the author. In your vast spare time, you will find it a must read and possibly the next project. Survival is insufficient and as I learned years ago, costuming is everything. Sleep when you can.

    • #2653
      rachely
      Participant

      Difference between stays and corsets–that 18th century stays aren’t designed to squish her waist like Victorian corsets.

      So maybe I mean a post on shapes. Bum rolls to make waist looks smaller; stays to make women look longer and to hold the breasts up, etc.

      • #2664
        kimgrimes
        Participant

        Hello, just wondering if you know will Canada have the same return date for episode 9 Outlander as the U.S.?

      • #2776
        Terry Dresbach
        Keymaster

        Yes, we nee to do our costume classes again! Good activity for the hiatus.

      • #3305
        danao
        Participant

        Yes please!

        I just recently disovered your blog and also the podcasts. Loving them!

    • #2679
      ValhallaLilly
      Participant

      Do you have to make dresses for every extra from scratch? Or you can rent them?
      How many people do you have working for you?
      How much sewing do you do? Or are you at this point a supervisor? (I don’t know how to say what I’m asking sorry)

      that’s all for now

      • #2777
        Terry Dresbach
        Keymaster

        [quote quote=2679]Do you have to make dresses for every extra from scratch? Or you can rent them?
        We make most of them, and rent whatever is available.
        How many people do you have working for you?
        30 – 70, depending on what is going on.
        How much sewing do you do? Or are you at this point a supervisor? (I don’t know how to say what I’m asking sorry)

        I understand. I do not sew, don’t know how. I understand the construction of garments and all the terminology, and I used to try to sew in my youth, but it is not what I do. I design, I draw, I conceive. And I see, most of all, I see.

        that’s all for now

        [/quote]

      • #3541
        ValhallaLilly
        Participant

        Hah that’s awesome. I mean I know it says “designer” but I always in my head saw them sewing too. I shouldn’t laugh but it amuses me that you don’t like to sew! I on the other hand could never see dresses like you do. amazing

    • #2692
      felicityann
      Participant

      Would love to learn about the production process. How do you divide work to produce so many costumes? on a complicated time-intensive single article or costume?

      Favorite techniques, or maybe More on some of the unique techniques you used for the show? (Your detail pieces on the wedding dress metal embroidery, sleeves, and pleats were fantastic!)

      Thanks for being so generous with your time and thoughts!

    • #2716
      annberg
      Participant

      I love your big ‘to do’ list! Is that your handwriting?!?

      What am I going to do during the Outlander hiatus…well, I am going to indulge my OCD tendencies and do research! I am a nurse find Claire’s, um, predicament as a 20th century nurse in the 18th century fascinating! I am of Irish ancestry so there’s that…which spills over into researching Scottish history. I have begun reading/listening to the series and will continue reading/listening as time allows.

      Terry, your commitment to the art of costuming is so evident in the care you and your team have taken with each character’s costume as part of developing each one to his/her fullest…I will be following your blog faithfully as well!

    • #2724
      Hilda S
      Participant

      I would love to know some tips on how to do the pleats in all of Claire’s dresses….I am pleat challenged!!!

      • #2742
        rachely
        Participant

        Lots of pins; lots of practice; lots of math. And lots of starch if you’re pleating cotton. Finally, lots of basting threads.

        I find it’s easier to pleat on fabric with a repeating pattern because you can line them up like plaids or stripes (google ‘kilts pleating to stripe pleating vs pleating to sett’). Otherwise if you have plain fabric you’ll need to use a marking pen. Google, again, has lots of advice on how to mark for pleats.

        Claire’s clothes have different kinds of pleats. The green tartan gown is knife pleated (which tend to be the easiest pleats), the wedding dress has cartridge pleats (which is a lot like smocking pleats–the pleats on those special-occasion little girl dresses). The waulking skirt has knife pleats but what makes it interesting is that the pleats are facing in different directions.

        Just grab some fabric and start practicing!

      • #3597
        KSchwatka
        Participant

        I am an American Civil War reenactor–when I make my dresses something I find helpful to use to get consistency with cartridge pleats is tiger tape. It’s sold in the quilting supplies and helps in gauging pleat size. I’ll also work in sections equal to the width of one skirt panel to make it easier to handle.

      • #4066
        warbrideslass
        Participant

        There was a good article in Threads a few years ago on doing cartridge pleats. I will see if I can find the issue. I remember it because I have two baby gowns from the 1700’s that are all cartridge pleated and have intricate very fine Ayrshire embroidery in the bodice. They are sold in antique shops as Christening gowns but I think many that survive were baby day gowns for pampered babies. I think the christening gowns of that era were much more elaborate. At least the ones likely to be still around. And any that were more simple likely didn’t survive.

    • #2774
      Terry Dresbach
      Keymaster

      [quote quote=2621]A couple of topics come to mind:
      1 – Given the Paris/Versailles setting for part of DIA, I’m guessing you’ll have options to rent costumes that you didn’t for other settings. What is the thought process around that?
      Nope. there is just not a lot available for rent these days, at least for this period. That was something of a shock, when we realized how much we were going to have to build. It almost killed us in Season One. So we are making 1000 costumes for Season Two extras.

      2 – Do you develop your sketches/ideas chronologically based on the story, or do you have some idea of potential shooting schedule, and (presuming it’s out of order) design that way? or something else?
      Usually we base it on scripts, conceptually, and then we design and make according to the shooting schedule. On this, I am incredibly lucky because I know the books so well, and I sleep next to the guy in charge of the writing. So I can ask him what is in and out, based on the books. Otherwise we just could not have pulled this off, and definitely could not have managed Season Two. I suppose we could have done SOMETHING, but it would have been crap, and I would have no part of that!

      3 – Do you ever pick DG’s brain about costume?
      No, I have enough brains to deal with as it is! 😉

      4 – Sketches/ideas for S1 costumes to come …. although I really try to let it unfold on screen first, then get into the artistry/decisions underneath it afterwards. … So, maybe that leads to

      Yes. Will I tell you, no ;D

      5 – Are there any un-explored topics from Ep1-8 of S1? Besides putting on the kilt, that is?[/quote]
      Yes

      • #4727
        Martina
        Participant

        1000 costumes for extras??! Wow. I just worked (as a volunteer) on some of the costumes for Boston Ballet’s new Swan Lake. That took 20 people 4 months, 260 costumes. We were sewing until opening night! But seeing them onstage was worth it.

    • #2779
      Terry Dresbach
      Keymaster

      [quote quote=2692]Would love to learn about the production process. How do you divide work to produce so many costumes? on a complicated time-intensive single article or costume?

      Favorite techniques, or maybe More on some of the unique techniques you used for the show? (Your detail pieces on the wedding dress metal embroidery, sleeves, and pleats were fantastic!)

      Thanks for being so generous with your time and thoughts!

      [/quote]

      I need to do a post about how we work. I will do it after my wee vacation.

      • #4068
        inklequeen
        Participant

        Not sure if this is going to appear next to the relevant question, so I’ll repeat just in case. Regarding your team of makers…when production gets underway do they all come over to work in Scotland? You have mentioned before that you have no control over employing makers from the UK and would love to if you could, but I also remember you saying you’d purchased knitted bits directly from online makers…..I’m confused, because surely buying from them and commissioning someone to make an item amounts to the same thing. Doesn’t it?
        I’m asking because I weave inkles, ( ribbon, tapes etc) that are frequently used for historical garments, both practically and for embellishment, trimming etc. and would love to be able to work on some inkles for Outlander!

        • This reply was modified 7 years, 7 months ago by inklequeen.
    • #2783
      Terry Dresbach
      Keymaster

      [quote quote=2724]I would love to know some tips on how to do the pleats in all of Claire’s dresses….I am pleat challenged!!![/quote]

      That is done by my wonderful team. I say millions of cartridge pleats, and voila!

      • #3378
        rachely
        Participant

        I’ve always found cartridge pleating rather soothing. You just make all those stitches that take no brain power to do and feels sort of zen and then you pull them and like MAGIC it pleats.

      • #3540
        ValhallaLilly
        Participant

        I’m glad someone likes pleats! I can’t stand them because I get so confused on how to fold them and what the depth is etc.
        I feel as though there should be a course for pleat work 😀

      • #4071
        inklequeen
        Participant

        Yes I agree….I have made Elizabethan ruffs and they entail lots and lots of tiny cartridge pleats! Because of the fineness of the cloth, they are lovely to work.
        On the other end of the scale I’ve made cartridge pleats on woollen broadcloth, and pulling those in is really tough on the fingers!

    • #2794
      ellenchristine
      Participant

      You mentioned that you will be posting about the Highlanders. Some questions arise:
      How many duplicates do they have, since they wear the basic same everyday garb?
      Black leather was a bold and appropriate choice for Dougal. How did you come to that decision?
      How many “formal” costumes did you build for the Gathering Highlanders?

    • #2795
      euromandy
      Participant

      It would be great to have a post about the production process (after your break, of course!), and get an idea of your department in action. As a costume professional myself, I always find it interesting how different designers and departments work. Each production is so unique. It’s so hard to describe what we do to people not around it every day. I’m pretty sure my own parents have no idea what I really do!

      Just a few things that I’ve wondered about:

      – What sort of instructions do you give regarding the background? Are there specific color palettes for different locations etc.? Are there costume boards of extras we’d be able to see sometime?
      – Does the show have a “core” group of re-occurring background (at Castle Leoch for example, or Black Jack’s Redcoats)? I know that often makes fittings easier, and helps create a believable world.
      – How many principal set costumers do you have? Do Sam and Cait have their own?
      – Do you work closely with props regarding weaponry?
      – How often are you able to be on set, with all the preparation that also needs to happen at the same time?
      – How do the weather and difficult conditions affect your crew? What do they struggle with the most on set?
      – Where does your build team work from, are they all in Scotland, or do you have shops elsewhere?
      – How many doubles of “regular” costume pieces do you generally have made? Such as Jamie’s frock coat and plaid, or the skirts and bodices in Claire’s general rotation.
      – What are some more examples of times you’ve had to tweak historical accuracy because of the medium, or to serve the action better?
      – What have been the challenges about working in Scotland as opposed to L.A. or somewhere more familiar?

      Anyway, just a few suggestions! Do try and get some rest!

    • #2799
      Divan_Diva
      Participant

      First off – BRAVO – KUDOS, etc. And I hope everyone takes time to listen to THE podcast that you and your husband do for each episode. Face it we are all watching them what – like 20 times, just make sure one of those times you turn down the sound and turn on the podcast – it is easy to sync. I know the Claire and Jamie are the iconic couple of the series, but honestly, I you and Ron are THE couple I am most impressed by!
      My questions are: 1. What is the sewing room space like – size, lighting, ventilation, layout or anything else of interest? (pictures?) 2. Do you have genies to keep it organized?, cleaned?, safe? A curator/inventory queen?, 3. Do you know what the main staple of sewing thread is (brand?) – that is all for today. When I sew/quilt, UTTER CHAOS! Never was a holy mess messier (certainly not holier) than designing/sewing entire costume to wear to my niece’s Victorian wedding. I needed minions – still do. Oh that is what I can do during the hiatus – excavate the sewing room. Ciao for Niao

    • #2803
      Bruce
      Participant

      Terry,
      I have been greatly enjoying your costumes in OUTLANDER. My question is pretty technical. It seems to me, most of the mens clothing, specifically, the jackets, appear to be cut slightly more modern in the chest and shoulder. The sleeve cap is cut for a more square shaped shoulder as opposed to the cap found in more period clothing, which would make for a more rounded, natural shoulder. It also looked like there was actually a sleeve head in the some of the sleeves. I was wondering if that was a choice, to make a contemporary shoulder and chest rather than a truer period one. I do realize that the less money/status a character has, the less the clothing will have a tailored fit, but those men with money/status should have truer fit.

      The shoulder,chest and sleeve head are more like this picture I am attaching.

      Again, Thank you for all your wonderful work.

    • #3030
      redgiraffe
      Participant

      This question unfortunately has spoilers — apologies and I’ll try to word it judiciously.

      This is a question I’m sure you can’t answer Terry, but I’m wondering whether the next season will incorporate the starting scenes of the next book — specifically Roger, Briana and the perspective of time? It’s been driving me a bit crazy. On the one hand, I love the flashback 1940/1740 perspectives developed in this season, but I have so often picked up the second book minutes after finishing the first and felt my heart sink at being back in the 20th century.

      I have difficulty imagining how you would dress and portray Claire plus 20 years, can you give us a hint?!.

    • #3121
      Angela
      Participant

      A while back you did a post about how you and Ron met. You mentioned that you’d tell the rest of the story after The Wedding episode. I love a good love story so if you have time during your break….

    • #3218
      Brooklyn Duchess
      Participant

      Hi Terry,
      I’ll be finishing the Outlander book in the hiatus- have to say in many ways the show is BETTER than the book! Question about Claire’s gowns. I notice many of them appear to have a stomacher. Are they false or do the mantuas really close that way?
      Thanks!

    • #3252
      Spiralight
      Participant

      Warning: Season 2/ Dragonfly in Amber spoiler -ish
      Hey Terry! Ever since I saw the costumes in Season 1 all i can think of is what is in store for us with the French gowns for season two, Any concept drawings done yet? I’m itching to see!!

      • This reply was modified 7 years, 7 months ago by Spiralight.
      • #3379
        rachely
        Participant

        Is it the King’s mistress who has the dress that sits below her pierced and bejeweled nipples? Please God let that make the scripts! 🙂

    • #3392
      Shanaynay
      Participant

      HI Terry…
      I am not sure if this question will come out as clear as it sounds in my head, but I am wondering how you work with production designers? Location and sets are so varied in terms of what they are, how they are lit, decorated, designed, etc., etc,… and I would think that such “backdrops” are so key to how your costumes are seen and experienced. How do you go about making sure that relationship works between production design and costume design? How much is worked out far ahead of time? While things are scouted and sorted well in advance and ideally costume production is underway early, I wonder if you have had to make any radical changes in a costume very close to or on shooting day because things were just not “looking” right?

      I know little to nothing about film making and production, so forgive me if this is a strange query!

      Enjoy your time off and safe travels.

    • #3442
      tulanoodle
      Participant

      Hi there Terry,
      I just wanted to put it out there that your work on this show has been such an inspiration for me. I work in animation and I had serious burnout when Outlander started. All the beautiful work you guys have done has really been an inspiration for me to do artwork for myself again, it can be hard after 8+ hours of working on someone else’s vision. Thank you! I plan on doing a lot of Outlander art during the hiatus, I can promise you that!

      Lauren

      tulanoodle.tumblr.com

    • #3550
      firstlove
      Participant

      [quote quote=2779]

      <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>felicityann wrote:</div>
      Would love to learn about the production process. How do you divide work to produce so many costumes? on a complicated time-intensive single article or costume?

      Favorite techniques, or maybe More on some of the unique techniques you used for the show? (Your detail pieces on the wedding dress metal embroidery, sleeves, and pleats were fantastic!)

      Thanks for being so generous with your time and thoughts!

      I need to do a post about how we work. I will do it after my wee vacation.

      [/quote]

      I am really looking forward to this post. Thank you in advance Terry. I really enjoyed the Starz “Dressing Outlander” segment. I hope season 2 will have something like this too. WOW! 1000 costumes to make…. I just can’t wait.

    • #3559
      ValhallaLilly
      Participant

      I thought of another.
      Where do you haunt to get ideas for the costumes. Websites, museums etc?
      An author I follow; Gail Carriger (sp?) is always posting dresses she’s found around the internet that inspire her.

    • #3585
      Lindsey
      Participant

      Dear Terry,
      I know that this is forward, but I can think of no other way to ask, but is there a way of contacting you…email, PO Box, etc. I’ve some questions (if you don’t mind) concerning costuming in general, along with the business. I’m not sure if you can see my contact information on my profile, but i don’t mind putting my email here. Admin can erase it (?) if need be. Thank you in advance.
      Lindsey

    • #3656
      DivingBell
      Participant

      As a designer, do you prefer constructing costumes for males or females? Perhaps the answer depends on time period, personality of the character and such.
      With that posited – the costumes for Claire are definitely more elaborate but, for instance, Jamie’s clothing has so many accessories and historical nuances that have to be paired. Do you prefer the more opulent costume versus the more detailed?

      Excited for the second half of season 1 and intrigued to hear the developments for season 2.

    • #3817
      tiggeros
      Participant

      SO, I’m reading DIA, because I haven’t for ages, and I wanted to start thinking of all the locations you guys might use (I live in France, so I have my ideas 😉 and have just go to the scene with the red dress. or rather the red dress and the nipple rings; which leads me to my question.
      Do you prefer designed clothes that have been very precisely described, as is the case here, or are you more looking forward to having free rein with the other ladies of the court?

      Thanks for taking the time to do this blog. It’s great. xx

    • #3884
      Terry Dresbach
      Keymaster

      I am going to start going through these questions and start putting them up on the blog.

      • #4212
        Lori
        Participant

        Hi Terry,

        I’m sorry if this is the wrong place to put this (it’s not costuming related), however, since it was mentioned in your blog, I thought I’d try here. My request is in regards to your blog post “An 18th Century House” (from March) – I found your blog “late” – so replied there in September. I really enjoyed this post and “Sanctuary” – if you’d like to, I’d really enjoy hearing more of your thoughts, now that you’ve lived in your lovely home in Scotland a while, about living more of an “18th Century Life” and how that works with the realities of your “day job”?

        Love your work and really appreciate your blog/forum!

        Thanks! Lori

    • #4254
      Terry Dresbach
      Keymaster

      [quote quote=3872]

      One of the challenges of this business, getting enough sleep. We run on empty a lot. When I was younger I used to get sick a lot, from exhaustion and stress. Somehow I have managed not to on this show, which is amazing considering that it has just been insanely stressful. But I lead a pretty clem life compared to my wild days when I first got started. I don’t smoke, I have one occasional cocktail in the evening, and I eat very healthfully.
      But I do not get enough sleep, that is a definite. I am exhausted all the time.
      Gary, our production designer, just got home, and slept for 20 hours straight.

      Have you found any time to meditate? I remember you mentioning it last year when you were getting acclimated back to Scotland–you were so jetlag.

      [/quote]

      I think we are signing up for transcendental meditation!

    • #4270
      Laurene
      Participant

      Terry, in the Rent episode Claire’s travel ensemble includes a fur-trimmed jacket and a pair of cream leather gloves. I am curious about whether there are any close-up photos of the gloves. The partials I have seen appear to show an antler decoration. I’d be interested in any background info on the design and/or making of those gloves.
      Many thanks.

    • #4290
      Gypsi
      Participant

      Hi Terry, I am new to the blog, and think you and your team do such a fantastic job with the show (and this site). I am curious if you are using hand-spun yarns for the knits? They look so rich and textured regardless, but I thought you might talk more of their origins. Thank you.

    • #4369
      Kirsten
      Participant

      Terry,
      I noticed your comment that you have been unable to rent costumes for Season 2 and wondered if you have checked the Venice rentals for carnival. Some could be reasonable for extras in the party scenes.
      Kirsten

    • #4408
      swisskari
      Participant

      Dear Terry,
      I am seeking advice on what steps to take in order to work in the costume design industry. I would be honored if you would be willing to answer some questions. My e-mail address is below.
      Thank you so much!
      Best Regards,
      Kari

    • #4470
      caitmcq
      Participant

      Sporrans. Before now, if I’d had to come up with a word to sound knowledgeable about Highlander clothing, I’d’ve said, “Sporrans,” with false confidence. And I’d’ve been thinking of those furry–and nicely rhythmic–things men wear in pipe bands. Now, thanks to you, I know that those pipe band uniforms are Victorian fantasies of historic Highland clothing (maybe filtered through military uniforms?). Your Highlanders are wearing non-furry pouches, which differ in detail from one another. And they don’t seem generally to be positioned over the mens’ crotches (excepting perhaps Ned?). Could you tell us anything about your research and choices of sporrans?
      So glad you’re willing (and enjoy, I hope) to tell us about your work!
      –Cait

    • #4853
      Terry Dresbach
      Keymaster

      [quote quote=4270]Terry, in the Rent episode Claire’s travel ensemble includes a fur-trimmed jacket and a pair of cream leather gloves. I am curious about whether there are any close-up photos of the gloves. The partials I have seen appear to show an antler decoration. I’d be interested in any background info on the design and/or making of those gloves.
      Many thanks.[/quote]

      Coming soon.

    • #4854
      Terry Dresbach
      Keymaster

      [quote quote=4470]Sporrans. Before now, if I’d had to come up with a word to sound knowledgeable about Highlander clothing, I’d’ve said, “Sporrans,” with false confidence. And I’d’ve been thinking of those furry–and nicely rhythmic–things men wear in pipe bands. Now, thanks to you, I know that those pipe band uniforms are Victorian fantasies of historic Highland clothing (maybe filtered through military uniforms?). Your Highlanders are wearing non-furry pouches, which differ in detail from one another. And they don’t seem generally to be positioned over the mens’ crotches (excepting perhaps Ned?). Could you tell us anything about your research and choices of sporrans?
      So glad you’re willing (and enjoy, I hope) to tell us about your work!
      –Cait[/quote]

      I was just sorting through some of my ideas from a year and a half ago, and I just knew not a lot about Scottish dress. I did a wedding sketch of Jamie based on the furry sporran, no waistcoat, no frock coat, and no proper kilt!!
      But then it was study time, and a few weeks later all was right with the world. One thing I love is how much you can continually learn in this job.

      • #4858
        rachely
        Participant

        Didn’t he have the badger sporran in the book? Bleech. Those are creepy.

    • #4861
      Terry Dresbach
      Keymaster

      [quote quote=4858]Didn’t he have the badger sporran in the book? Bleech. Those are creepy.[/quote]
      Yes, which is why I drew it. But most of the sporrans we came across in our research were leather or cloth.

    • #8044
      elissa
      Participant

      Hello Terry, are there any openings for a work experience student in your busy costume studio? I am a one time fashion designer, now frustrated under-utilised high school textiles teacher, who would love to take a month off work, travel to Scotland and embark on some serious costuming.

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