Terry Dresbach

Outlander Costume Designer

DIY Costume in Norway!

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  • #4480
    Narum
    Participant

    Hello there, forum! I recently stumbled into here after discovering the amazingly fantastic Outlander – I got inspired, and I now want to make a costume, true to the series’ period.

    As a young student, living in Norway – my budget is not noteworthy, so I must scan thrift shops, buy cloth online, ask friends and family for old clothing and so on.

    So, I guess my main question is, what materials would I need to gather in order to create an “authentic” Outlander costume? I want to either make Dougall’s general attire or Jamie’s wedding attire. As I live in Norway, I’m not sure how easy it will be – but if it’s challenging, it’s fun!

    Why all this? Well, I love Scotland and its history. It’s entirely unique, and interesting. Also, my cousin is married to a scotsman! She now lives in Whitburn, West Lothian. I also enjoy attenting to fairs, meet-ups, cons and the likes. So this really caught my interest.

    I hope this isn’t a question that is too similar to the others – since I guess there’s quite many “how to make” threads here.

    Love from Norway!

    – Benjamin

    • This topic was modified 7 years, 7 months ago by Narum.
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    • #4495
      rachely
      Participant

      Assuming you are making it would cost a lot.

      Any kilt like those takes between 5-9 yards (ummm, math, 4.5-8ish metres?) of wool depending on how deep your pleating is, how big the person wearing it is, etc. In America at least, any tartan that’s not a standard one (Stuart, Black Watch, Wallace) have to be ordered from Scotland. A weathered light weight MacKenzie from Kinloch Anderson is $92 (USD), for example.

      So, before you get to the rest of the outfit it’s expensive. At a guess, you’d need 2ish yards each fabric and lining for a waistcoat, 4ish yards each fabric and lining for a coat, and 3+ yards of linen for the shirt.Plus linen thread, silk thread, patterns, belts, leather lacing, stockings, shoes/boots…

      Basically, unless you are buying fabric at wholesale prices it’s a small fortune.

      You can buy some stuff pre-made at least here in the U.S. You can usually buy cotton or muslin men’s shirts for cheaper than linen (fabric or made), you can usually find waistcoats and jackets made. And the kilt is just a giant length of fabric, so it basically costs the same since there is no “made”.

      But, when it comes down to it, it’s the kilt that is going to cost (they do make poly/wool blends sometimes of tartans that are cheaper, but then your pattern options are going to be limited)

      Was that depressing enough?

    • #4496
      rachely
      Participant

      And if the question was more like “what are they wearing” the answer would be:

      -stockings
      -shoes or boots
      -an 18th century men’s shirt (traditionally no buttons, over-the-head, goes to the knees, probably is full of gathers)
      -a kilt of some sort (you could get away with a battle kilt and a plaid since chances are you’re not going to be able to beg/borrow that much fabric for a great kilt)
      -a waistcoat
      -a coat
      -a stock
      -belt(s)
      -sword/dirk/sgian-dubh
      -sporran
      -brooch

      and probably something I’m forgetting

    • #4497
      michellibell
      Participant

      Ben – I often have to design historically accurate “looking” costumes for theater, but I’m not worried about them being very authentic. They just need to look authentic from the stage.

      I find quite a few of my pieces at thrift stores – especially after Halloween and Dickens Christmas celebrations.
      Good luck!

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