Terry Dresbach

Outlander Costume Designer

Category Archives: Costume Design

Details…the Latest, Claire ‘Blueberry’, and Analiese ‘Dressage’

30

L1001706_edited-1IMG_1038_edited-1

I have an endless stream of these pics. They will take us all the way through Droughtlander. It is not only a way to share the kind of detail my team accomplished, but also a look at how staggeringly enormous S2 was. It is overwhelming in retrospect and interesting to now be dealing with the concern that I overwhelm the blog. Can viewers take it all in?? I really don’t know.

Anyway, the Blueberry was created because I found this gorgeous pice of fabric, once again at Britex. I was really playing with colour and decided to embroider the brilliant red leaves on it. Not only did it make for a stunning costume for Claire and highlighted the opulence of Paris, but it highlighted the beautiful colours in the fabric in a really dramatic way.

L1001725_edited-1 L1001708 L1001703 L1001702 L1001695 L1001693_edited-1 L1001691 L1001684

This costume of Annalise’s is one of my favourites. Annualise gave us, as did Louise, the chance to once again, define Paris and to define Claire, in juxtaposition. We went to town on this costume, the same way did on Louise’s costumes. It was an opportunity to just show the viewer how complex and detailed 18th century clothing could be.

In story terms, it highlights how foreign and decadent this world is that Jamie and Claire have to navigate. How they stand out in contrast to that world and yet carry the simplicity and elegance of Scotland and of the 1940s into the French court.

L1001622 L1001611 L1001591 L1001584 L1001582 L1001579 L1001568 L1001565 L1001562

 

Louise – Versailles

28

Outlander Season 2 2016

Louise was absolutely essential to our entire structure. She was actually a cornerstone.

I set a very public goal before we ever started filming Outlander. To be as authentic as possible. Of course you can never be truly authentic. There is no way to make thousands of garments by hand, in the time we have. We can’t use actual 18th century materials, in short we are making costumes, not reproductions. But I did not want to present a contemporary view of history. As I say over and over, “History is pretty good, just as it is! It needs no help from us.”

But we knew that we were going to play this time travel note with Claire. The ONLY way that works is if the world around her is very, very true to the period. Otherwise it is just a mess. We lose all accuracy, and Claire’s message gets completely lost in the jumble. Louise (and Mary) are the female supporting characters, they are Parisians. They MUST be absolutely SPOT ON.

Louise’s character really lends itself well to the task. A somewhat vapid coquette, a member of the Parisian Aristocracy, she is an 18th Century fashionista of the first order. She can carry the water. Louise can define Parisian fashion for us, and create a backdrop for Claire. She is our contrast.

We looked to some really spectacular gowns worn by Madame Pompadour and other ladies of the French Court.

Untitled-1

6293375700_988277519f_b

One of the costumes we do that with is her Versailles gown. I chose the most flagrant fabric I could find. A wildly sensual embroidered silk. the colours on it are outrageous.

IMG_3614_edited-1

Trying to remember the name…something Peony. Very Chinoiserie, which was an influence of the period through the silk trade.

The most fun thing about the gown was that no matter HOW MUCH we threw at the gown, it just absorbed it. Bows, furbelows, lace, flowers, jewels, nothing was too much for this dress. I think we could have added even more but had to stop at some point.

It is rare to have so many great pictures of one costume, but the publicity dept. shot this from every possible angle. Fantastic. I have added a few more, so keep scrolling, there are a zillion pictures. I think the best thing is just to post them all. I guess this dress really can never be too much.

Enjoy!

Outlander Season 2 Gallery Pictured: Claire Sermonne as Louise de Rohan Photo: Jason Bell/Starz/Courtesy of Sony Pictures Television

47

Outlander-Louise-de-Rohan-Season-2-Official-Picture-outlander-2014-tv-series-39420026-1948-2598

Outlander-Louise-de-Rohan-Season-2-Official-Picture-outlander-2014-tv-series-39420029-1948-2598

IMG_4538

IMG_4342

Furbelow construction –

IMG_4345

IMG_4344

IMG_4516

IMG_4519

IMG_4522

IMG_4716

IMG_1034 (1)

Voila! Louise.

Red

46

5854613624_f86983eb21_o

Not sure there is very much more to say about the red dress, that hasn’t been covered extensively.

Mood boards and various notes, below…

© Mark Shaw / mptvimages.com

Dior

Untitled-1

 

photo_edited-1

Untitled-2_edited-1

Untitled-4

 

 

 

Dior_2013_Zemire_edited-2

Interesting re invention of a classic Dior from the late 40s. The New Look has been reinterpreted so many, many times.

tumblr_o2lmhsBoP31rwahceo1_1280

I was so worried that because Cait is so very fair, that she would be overpowered by brilliant red. It is neither an easy color to use onscreen, but it can eat up a mere mortal. The color made Cait glow like some sort of natural candle flame.

Extraordinary. The dress will NEVER look as good on a mannequin as it does on this particular living, breathing, being.

tumblr_o5cssrdcZh1s1rviio1_1280

A quote from Cait-

“It’s a beautiful dress and such a fan moment in the books. Jamie has to say, ‘You can see all the way down to your third rib,’ and it had to fulfill all these different things, so Terry did such an incredible job with it. But walking anywhere, I had to do this kind of sideways crab walk. It was like, ‘Wide load, coming through!’ I thought all that I was missing was the, ‘Beep! Beep! Beep!’ that these massive trucks had.”

One of Balfe’s favorite additions that the writers made is the fact that Claire helps design the dress herself.

“It was nice to be able to see Claire explore her femininity, because she’s usually such a practical and pragmatic person, and not at all interested in her appearance. Being able to see her dressing up for the first time ever, that was a nice element.”

( Fifteen yards of Duchesse Satin)

IMG_0912one

IMG_0926

red bodice

 

IMG_0919

IMG_0928

IMG_0029

IMG_4757 (2)

When trying to figure how to address the notes from the book, I came across this painting.

CgYOaZrUsAEiBYf.jpg-large

It gave me the idea that if Claire took a traditional bodice, such as this-

Red Sketch 1  took the embellishment off, and then she opened up the front seam, she would end up with this  –Red Bodice 2

I think it worked for the story and paid homage to the book and the fans of the book/

 

One last thing- I insisted that we make this. So my amazing team did. They are, once again, the best.

IMG_3596

There you go

tumblr_mggw8brtbx1r67qauo1_500

 

 

 

 

 

Master Raymond

53

He was always by my favourite and there is no costume I have looked forward to doing more on Outlander.

Let’s start with the mood boards.

Mst. Raymond

Master RaymondWe were pretty deeply into embroidery at that point, really playing with what we could do.

I wanted him to have just one costume. His pharmacists coat. Does Master Raymond take it off and hang it on a hook at night, or does he lie down in a pallet in the back of his shop, never taking the magical thing off?

I thought that I would like to tell a story about his work. So two images illustrate principles of alchemy. The Tree Of Knowledge and The Hand Of Mysteries. The other two are diseases and the herbs that cured them.

The Coat:

IMG_5346_edited-1

IMG_5437

IMG_1064 (1)We decided to represent the disease with a monster, having found a fantastic array of monsters while doing research.

The Bird represents Yellow Fever, placing his yellow claw into the eye. One of the symptoms of yellow fever was that the white of the eye would turn bright yellow.

The other panel is Gout. A delightful Gout monster is gnawing on the inflamed foot.

The herbs which are supposed to cure it, are woven into the disease. I don’t have my notes with me, on which herbs they are, but it is not hard to find the info, if you are interested.

I don’t remember the genesis of the back, if it was a compilation of images we’d found, or if it was based on something we found. I fell in love with these illustrations of potion bottles. There was also a lot of skull imagery. An easy combination.

09a6472a452a1e3a1c3e0f32385b86c4 e0838554988d3e37065d1b9014178fb7

56445bcccf8ad7f3062989e8193ed5ab

 

IMG_1068

IMG_1069_edited-1

IMG_1066

IMG_1070

Work in progress-

IMG_3602

IMG_3591

  • A very special shout out to my Embroidery team – Liz, Fiona, Julia and Francesca, and to Helen Galogly, our textile artist. They are the best.

Enjoy!

France.

22

Image 5

Confession. These costumes, I barely remember. I wish I could give everyone a deep, meaningful account of the thought process that went into these costumes. But I can’t.

We were deeply deeply into Season Two costume making when it came time to get Claire and Jamie on the ship from Scotland to France at the end of Season One. We were up to our eyeballs.  We knew we would need to make a new costume for Jamie, and that was manageable for us. Our men’s cutting team are amazing wizards. But we lost our women’s cutting team in the middle of Season Two prep, and were struggling to get all of our women’s costumes Done, and were using a rotation of temporary cutters. Cutters are the members of a costume team who translate the designers sketches into pattern, then cuts the fabric and supervises the costumes construction. Essential members of the department. Losing them was a terrible blow to us, and we were really scrambling to make all of our deadlines. So having to make another costume for Claire was going to be tough.

I remembered that we still had, one of the very first costumes we had ever made for Claire somewhere in the racks. I think it was the second costume we’d made for her, and for some reason we decided not to use it, and never finished it. We dug it up and found our solution. We could finish it without having to design and cut an entirely new gown.And it was actually quite perfect for a traveling costume, procured for Claire by the monks. A pretty gown, but nothing spectacular. It was completely believable that it would have belonged to someone else.

Image 7

 

One of the things I loved best about this gown was the lovely embroidered stomacher we had made. It came from a piece of embroidered fabric we picked up shopping at the Portobello Market in London. It was also one of the first examples I had seen of metal plate embroidery, which a had completely fallen in love with, and we ultimately used on Claire’s wedding dress.

Image 9

Image 9

We didn’t even have an embroidery team at that point in the very beginning of Season One. But Liz Boulton had let me in on her skill as a historical embroidery. I asked if she could embroider a petticoat to match the piece of antique fabric, and we ended up with a very sweet gown. It was perfect for embarking on a new life in France.

Image 11

Jamie was an entirely different matter. He had to be smuggled out of France after suffering through soul shattering torture at the hands of Black Jack Randall. He had been stripped bare of everything, literally, figuratively, and emotionally, and brought back from the brink by Claire and his own strong core and will to live, that we had seen many times.

He too was given clothes by the monks. We dressed him as a middle class merchant, trying to do everything possible to make him look unremarkable, a task as difficult to accomplish wth the very real Sam Heughan as it was with the fictional Jamie. We made a costume out of linen, and topped it with a tricorn hat. Very un- Jamie.

Image 10

But they both passed.

There are two other costumes of note as we travel with our heroes into France.

*** Note: I have searched high and low for a pic of Jared. I am putting in the description anyway, because he is important. I will try to find one ***

First we meet Jamie’s cousin Jared, a Scotsman living in France. A wealthy and successful wine merchant, Jared is solidly bourgeois, wearing silk as was common in France, but fairly plain and simple. We kept him in earth tones, as a nod to Scotland.

Jared was so important to us. He is the justification we desperately needed when it came to the costumes. Jamie and Claire needed to move in the very wealthy circles of  the French Court. It would have been impossible without the appropriate wardrobe. Jared offers to bankroll them, making it possible for them to move into the inner circle, dressed in the most fashionable attire.

Our next character is very important on the journey. The Comte St. Germaine. He is the first representative of the French Aristocracy that we see. He is elegant and dangerous. I also wanted to dress him in colors we would have never used in Scotland. I put him in brown and pink after seeing a beautiful 18th century painting of a man wearing those colors. Rich, decadent and very sensual.

He was our first look at what was to come when Jamie and Claire finally arrived in Paris.

This was one of our first embroidered men’s costumes.

Image 12 copy

Image 13 Costume Design | Terry Dresbach

Terry Dresbach

Outlander Costume Designer

Category Archives: Costume Design

Details…the Latest, Claire ‘Blueberry’, and Analiese ‘Dressage’

30

L1001706_edited-1IMG_1038_edited-1

I have an endless stream of these pics. They will take us all the way through Droughtlander. It is not only a way to share the kind of detail my team accomplished, but also a look at how staggeringly enormous S2 was. It is overwhelming in retrospect and interesting to now be dealing with the concern that I overwhelm the blog. Can viewers take it all in?? I really don’t know.

Anyway, the Blueberry was created because I found this gorgeous pice of fabric, once again at Britex. I was really playing with colour and decided to embroider the brilliant red leaves on it. Not only did it make for a stunning costume for Claire and highlighted the opulence of Paris, but it highlighted the beautiful colours in the fabric in a really dramatic way.

L1001725_edited-1 L1001708 L1001703 L1001702 L1001695 L1001693_edited-1 L1001691 L1001684

This costume of Annalise’s is one of my favourites. Annualise gave us, as did Louise, the chance to once again, define Paris and to define Claire, in juxtaposition. We went to town on this costume, the same way did on Louise’s costumes. It was an opportunity to just show the viewer how complex and detailed 18th century clothing could be.

In story terms, it highlights how foreign and decadent this world is that Jamie and Claire have to navigate. How they stand out in contrast to that world and yet carry the simplicity and elegance of Scotland and of the 1940s into the French court.

L1001622 L1001611 L1001591 L1001584 L1001582 L1001579 L1001568 L1001565 L1001562

 

Louise – Versailles

28

Outlander Season 2 2016

Louise was absolutely essential to our entire structure. She was actually a cornerstone.

I set a very public goal before we ever started filming Outlander. To be as authentic as possible. Of course you can never be truly authentic. There is no way to make thousands of garments by hand, in the time we have. We can’t use actual 18th century materials, in short we are making costumes, not reproductions. But I did not want to present a contemporary view of history. As I say over and over, “History is pretty good, just as it is! It needs no help from us.”

But we knew that we were going to play this time travel note with Claire. The ONLY way that works is if the world around her is very, very true to the period. Otherwise it is just a mess. We lose all accuracy, and Claire’s message gets completely lost in the jumble. Louise (and Mary) are the female supporting characters, they are Parisians. They MUST be absolutely SPOT ON.

Louise’s character really lends itself well to the task. A somewhat vapid coquette, a member of the Parisian Aristocracy, she is an 18th Century fashionista of the first order. She can carry the water. Louise can define Parisian fashion for us, and create a backdrop for Claire. She is our contrast.

We looked to some really spectacular gowns worn by Madame Pompadour and other ladies of the French Court.

Untitled-1

6293375700_988277519f_b

One of the costumes we do that with is her Versailles gown. I chose the most flagrant fabric I could find. A wildly sensual embroidered silk. the colours on it are outrageous.

IMG_3614_edited-1

Trying to remember the name…something Peony. Very Chinoiserie, which was an influence of the period through the silk trade.

The most fun thing about the gown was that no matter HOW MUCH we threw at the gown, it just absorbed it. Bows, furbelows, lace, flowers, jewels, nothing was too much for this dress. I think we could have added even more but had to stop at some point.

It is rare to have so many great pictures of one costume, but the publicity dept. shot this from every possible angle. Fantastic. I have added a few more, so keep scrolling, there are a zillion pictures. I think the best thing is just to post them all. I guess this dress really can never be too much.

Enjoy!

Outlander Season 2 Gallery Pictured: Claire Sermonne as Louise de Rohan Photo: Jason Bell/Starz/Courtesy of Sony Pictures Television

47

Outlander-Louise-de-Rohan-Season-2-Official-Picture-outlander-2014-tv-series-39420026-1948-2598

Outlander-Louise-de-Rohan-Season-2-Official-Picture-outlander-2014-tv-series-39420029-1948-2598

IMG_4538

IMG_4342

Furbelow construction –

IMG_4345

IMG_4344

IMG_4516

IMG_4519

IMG_4522

IMG_4716

IMG_1034 (1)

Voila! Louise.

Red

46

5854613624_f86983eb21_o

Not sure there is very much more to say about the red dress, that hasn’t been covered extensively.

Mood boards and various notes, below…

© Mark Shaw / mptvimages.com

Dior

Untitled-1

 

photo_edited-1

Untitled-2_edited-1

Untitled-4

 

 

 

Dior_2013_Zemire_edited-2

Interesting re invention of a classic Dior from the late 40s. The New Look has been reinterpreted so many, many times.

tumblr_o2lmhsBoP31rwahceo1_1280

I was so worried that because Cait is so very fair, that she would be overpowered by brilliant red. It is neither an easy color to use onscreen, but it can eat up a mere mortal. The color made Cait glow like some sort of natural candle flame.

Extraordinary. The dress will NEVER look as good on a mannequin as it does on this particular living, breathing, being.

tumblr_o5cssrdcZh1s1rviio1_1280

A quote from Cait-

“It’s a beautiful dress and such a fan moment in the books. Jamie has to say, ‘You can see all the way down to your third rib,’ and it had to fulfill all these different things, so Terry did such an incredible job with it. But walking anywhere, I had to do this kind of sideways crab walk. It was like, ‘Wide load, coming through!’ I thought all that I was missing was the, ‘Beep! Beep! Beep!’ that these massive trucks had.”

One of Balfe’s favorite additions that the writers made is the fact that Claire helps design the dress herself.

“It was nice to be able to see Claire explore her femininity, because she’s usually such a practical and pragmatic person, and not at all interested in her appearance. Being able to see her dressing up for the first time ever, that was a nice element.”

( Fifteen yards of Duchesse Satin)

IMG_0912one

IMG_0926

red bodice

 

IMG_0919

IMG_0928

IMG_0029

IMG_4757 (2)

When trying to figure how to address the notes from the book, I came across this painting.

CgYOaZrUsAEiBYf.jpg-large

It gave me the idea that if Claire took a traditional bodice, such as this-

Red Sketch 1  took the embellishment off, and then she opened up the front seam, she would end up with this  –Red Bodice 2

I think it worked for the story and paid homage to the book and the fans of the book/

 

One last thing- I insisted that we make this. So my amazing team did. They are, once again, the best.

IMG_3596

There you go

tumblr_mggw8brtbx1r67qauo1_500

 

 

 

 

 

Master Raymond

53

He was always by my favourite and there is no costume I have looked forward to doing more on Outlander.

Let’s start with the mood boards.

Mst. Raymond

Master RaymondWe were pretty deeply into embroidery at that point, really playing with what we could do.

I wanted him to have just one costume. His pharmacists coat. Does Master Raymond take it off and hang it on a hook at night, or does he lie down in a pallet in the back of his shop, never taking the magical thing off?

I thought that I would like to tell a story about his work. So two images illustrate principles of alchemy. The Tree Of Knowledge and The Hand Of Mysteries. The other two are diseases and the herbs that cured them.

The Coat:

IMG_5346_edited-1

IMG_5437

IMG_1064 (1)We decided to represent the disease with a monster, having found a fantastic array of monsters while doing research.

The Bird represents Yellow Fever, placing his yellow claw into the eye. One of the symptoms of yellow fever was that the white of the eye would turn bright yellow.

The other panel is Gout. A delightful Gout monster is gnawing on the inflamed foot.

The herbs which are supposed to cure it, are woven into the disease. I don’t have my notes with me, on which herbs they are, but it is not hard to find the info, if you are interested.

I don’t remember the genesis of the back, if it was a compilation of images we’d found, or if it was based on something we found. I fell in love with these illustrations of potion bottles. There was also a lot of skull imagery. An easy combination.

09a6472a452a1e3a1c3e0f32385b86c4 e0838554988d3e37065d1b9014178fb7

56445bcccf8ad7f3062989e8193ed5ab

 

IMG_1068

IMG_1069_edited-1

IMG_1066

IMG_1070

Work in progress-

IMG_3602

IMG_3591

  • A very special shout out to my Embroidery team – Liz, Fiona, Julia and Francesca, and to Helen Galogly, our textile artist. They are the best.

Enjoy!

France.

22

Image 5

Confession. These costumes, I barely remember. I wish I could give everyone a deep, meaningful account of the thought process that went into these costumes. But I can’t.

We were deeply deeply into Season Two costume making when it came time to get Claire and Jamie on the ship from Scotland to France at the end of Season One. We were up to our eyeballs.  We knew we would need to make a new costume for Jamie, and that was manageable for us. Our men’s cutting team are amazing wizards. But we lost our women’s cutting team in the middle of Season Two prep, and were struggling to get all of our women’s costumes Done, and were using a rotation of temporary cutters. Cutters are the members of a costume team who translate the designers sketches into pattern, then cuts the fabric and supervises the costumes construction. Essential members of the department. Losing them was a terrible blow to us, and we were really scrambling to make all of our deadlines. So having to make another costume for Claire was going to be tough.

I remembered that we still had, one of the very first costumes we had ever made for Claire somewhere in the racks. I think it was the second costume we’d made for her, and for some reason we decided not to use it, and never finished it. We dug it up and found our solution. We could finish it without having to design and cut an entirely new gown.And it was actually quite perfect for a traveling costume, procured for Claire by the monks. A pretty gown, but nothing spectacular. It was completely believable that it would have belonged to someone else.

Image 7

 

One of the things I loved best about this gown was the lovely embroidered stomacher we had made. It came from a piece of embroidered fabric we picked up shopping at the Portobello Market in London. It was also one of the first examples I had seen of metal plate embroidery, which a had completely fallen in love with, and we ultimately used on Claire’s wedding dress.

Image 9

Image 9

We didn’t even have an embroidery team at that point in the very beginning of Season One. But Liz Boulton had let me in on her skill as a historical embroidery. I asked if she could embroider a petticoat to match the piece of antique fabric, and we ended up with a very sweet gown. It was perfect for embarking on a new life in France.

Image 11

Jamie was an entirely different matter. He had to be smuggled out of France after suffering through soul shattering torture at the hands of Black Jack Randall. He had been stripped bare of everything, literally, figuratively, and emotionally, and brought back from the brink by Claire and his own strong core and will to live, that we had seen many times.

He too was given clothes by the monks. We dressed him as a middle class merchant, trying to do everything possible to make him look unremarkable, a task as difficult to accomplish wth the very real Sam Heughan as it was with the fictional Jamie. We made a costume out of linen, and topped it with a tricorn hat. Very un- Jamie.

Image 10

But they both passed.

There are two other costumes of note as we travel with our heroes into France.

*** Note: I have searched high and low for a pic of Jared. I am putting in the description anyway, because he is important. I will try to find one ***

First we meet Jamie’s cousin Jared, a Scotsman living in France. A wealthy and successful wine merchant, Jared is solidly bourgeois, wearing silk as was common in France, but fairly plain and simple. We kept him in earth tones, as a nod to Scotland.

Jared was so important to us. He is the justification we desperately needed when it came to the costumes. Jamie and Claire needed to move in the very wealthy circles of  the French Court. It would have been impossible without the appropriate wardrobe. Jared offers to bankroll them, making it possible for them to move into the inner circle, dressed in the most fashionable attire.

Our next character is very important on the journey. The Comte St. Germaine. He is the first representative of the French Aristocracy that we see. He is elegant and dangerous. I also wanted to dress him in colors we would have never used in Scotland. I put him in brown and pink after seeing a beautiful 18th century painting of a man wearing those colors. Rich, decadent and very sensual.

He was our first look at what was to come when Jamie and Claire finally arrived in Paris.

This was one of our first embroidered men’s costumes.

Image 12 copy

Image 13

Buttons!! We were coming to terms with how quickly we were going to run out of buttons, and decided to start making our own.

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